Tag Archives: Yamaha Outboards

Conservation Tournament Win-Win for Anglers, Yamaha Outboards

 

 

Conservation Tournament Win-Win for Anglers, Yamaha Outboards

By Craig Lamb

The CCA Florida STAR presented by Yamaha is a win-win for saltwater anglers. For 101 days this summer they have the chance to win $500,000 in prizes, including three Carolina Skiff® boats powered by Yamaha Outboards. On the flip side, marine scientists will use catch data to preserve fishing for the future.

The prizes will be awarded for catching tagged redfish. There are other prizes and categories too, making this a great excuse for going fishing in the coastal and offshore waters of Florida.

How you win the prizes is by entering STAR, which stands for State-wide Tournament Anglers Rodeo. It is a catch and photograph format tournament that began on Memorial Day and ends on Sept. 4. The tournament is open to members in good standing of the Coastal Conservation Association, or non-members can enter for $65. Entry fee for CCA members is $35. Click here to join CCA™.

STAR was a huge success last year. The 157 tagged redfish released throughout Florida coastal waters, and the 13 additional divisions, caught the attention of 5,000 registered anglers. The motivation was catching one of the first seven tagged redfish for the chance to win a new GMC Sierra®, a boat, motor, and trailer package valued at over $40,000.

Beyond that, the family-friendly tournament awarded a college scholarship and the chance to win other prizes. Those prizes can be won by entering catches in the additional divisions. Those are Open, Ladies, Fly, Kayak, Lionfish, and Professional Guides division. Eligible species are Spotted Seatrout, Snook, Sheepshead, Non-tagged Redfish, Cobia, Dolphin (Mahi Mahi) & Kingfish.

The Tagged Redfish Division is by far one of the most popular for a huge reason. Click this link to find out the reasons why.

Another fun division for STAR anglers, unique to Florida, is the Conservation Division. This division is designed to reward anglers that provide the most catch data on all fish caught and released while fishing the tournament, no matter what species or size.

STAR entries provide a significant amount of catch data. The conservation community uses the information to make science-based decisions that benefit habitat management, stock assessment and more, to make fishing better all around for Florida anglers.

Visit Yamaha Outboards.com

 

This document contains many of Yamaha’s valuable trademarks. It may also contain trademarks belonging to other companies. Any references to other companies or their products are for identification purposes only, and are not intended to be an endorsement.

 

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle

 

 

Big Bass Bucket List Trip

 

Big Bass Bucket List Trip

By Craig Lamb

Is a double-digit weight largemouth bass on your bucket list? Check it off with a trip to Lake Fork, the East Texas bass fishery with more 13-pound-plus ShareLunkers caught than anywhere else in the Lone Star State.

Increase your odds of catching the trophy of a lifetime by booking a guide trip with Mark Pack Professional Lake Fork Guide Service. The longtime guide and pro angler will you more than your money’s worth on a trip. Think education, know how, and learning to be a better bass fisherman.

Pack is dually qualified for all of the above. He’s won over $500,000 on the FLW Tour. Pack also has a hand in designing lures. He’s been doing just that for over 25 years. M-Pack Lures, his company, turns out some of the most innovative baits available, including the line of Structure Guard lures.

What about those ShareLunkers? The official name of the one-of-a-kind trophy largemouth program is Toyota ShareLunker, which is managed by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department.

Anglers catching a largemouth weighing 13 pounds or more can donate the healthy catch for research purposes and breeding. ShareLunker began in 1986 on Lake Fork. Since then, the lake has produced more entries, 276 and counting, than any other lake in Texas.

Lake Fork is where it all began for Pack. His guide business and lure company are located there.

“I offer full-time guide services on Lake Fork,” he said. “I have several well-qualified guides who help me out.

We fish from Skeeter Boats with all the top of the line equipment,” he continued.

Pack wouldn’t run anything but a Skeeter for a reason. Coincidentally, Skeeter Boats are made not far from Lake Fork, in nearby Kilgore, Texas. Not far from Kilgore, back in 1948, Texan Holmes Thurmond built the first Skeeter in 1948. Since then, Skeeter has been setting the standard, raising the bar, and leaving the rest of the boating industry in the wake of its innovative design, quality construction, and satisfied customers.

The reason is performance. Take a demo ride and experience the 90-degree maneuverability test. Quick hole shots, superb turning, extreme stability, and a smooth dry ride are what set Skeeter apart from the competition. Learn more about the performance features by clicking here.

 

So does Skeeter’s revolutionary transom and stringer. The Torque Transfer System and the REACT KEEL. Both are more design and performance innovations. Watch this video to learn more about the features, advantages, and benefits of the REACT KEEL. See the Torque Transfer System video here.

Combine all of the features and legendary design and construction of Skeeter, and you have the industry’s top line bass boat, the FX Series. Click here to find out more about the FX20, FX21, FX20LE and FX21LE.

Guide rates are $500 per day. Half-day rates are $350. A full day is 8 hours. Add $125 for a third person in the guided party.

The pack provides lures at no additional cost. What else you get, at no additional cost, is a wealth of knowledge from one of bass fishing’s top lure designers, pros and guides on the top trophy lake in Texas.

Ready to book a trip? Click here for more information.  Visit Skeeter Boats.com Today!

 

 

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

 

Fishing the Chesapeake

 

Fishing the Chesapeake

by Craig Lamb

 

Meet Captain Shannon Pickens, a lifelong resident of Maryland’s Eastern Shore and Yamaha professional angler.

“I grew up fishing here since I was a little kid and love it, just love it,” he said.

 

Pickens should indeed. Today he makes a living operating Working Girl Charters (FishTheChesapeakeBay.com). The waters are rich in tradition for guides and commercial captains like Pickens.

“We have everything here from shallow water fishing to out in the Bay and into the ocean,” he explained.

That covers all of the saltwater game fish species sought by anglers, from flounder to tuna, striped bass to marlin.

Homeport for Pickens is Tilghman Island, Md. He often fishes from the Papa John, a 27’ Contender center console powered by twin Yamaha 4.2L V6 Offshore Outboards.

“We have a number of big charter boats around here but not many center console, light tackle boats,” continued Pickens.

“It’s a 2005 Contender®, and those Yamahas have over 4,500 hours* and going,” he said.

“One day I might be fishing in 1 or 2 feet of water in the Bay and can run 70 miles the next day and chase tuna or marlin.”

Yamaha powers those competitive advantages, he believes.

“The efficiency and quietness of the outboards allows me to get into some of the shallowest water around, the rock piles and other highly productive areas inaccessible by the bigger boats.”

Pickens’ choice is Yamaha’s next generation of V6 4.2L Offshore outboards. Class leading big-bore design means the outboards have the best time-to-plane. Also leading the class is an outboard that is the lightest weight in its class with the largest displacement. Yamaha’s V6 4.2L offshore models feature up to 17% better long range fuel economy.

“What means the most to me is the reliability of my Yamahas,” he added. “I know my Yamahas will perform to the standards that I expect and that my clients expect when they get on board.”

Confidence is another factor in why Pickens relies on Yamaha.

“I know if you’ve got confidence in your equipment that lets you focus on the rest of what you’ve got going on around you,” he said.

Visit Yamaha Outboards.com Today!

 

 

*Results are based on commercial use, and may vary for traditional retail consumer use.  This document contains many of Yamaha’s valuable trademarks. It may also contain trademarks belonging to other companies. Any references to other companies or their products are for identification purposes only, and are not intended to be an endorsement.

 

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

 

Summer Dolphin Tactics

 

Summer Dolphin Tactics

By Capt. Gus Cane

 

Dolphin, Dorado, mahimahi. No matter what you call them these neon green, yellow and blue speedsters are perhaps the perfect pelagic game fish. Why? Because they fight extremely hard, they are common in warm waters around the world, they grow super fast, and they taste delicious. That’s why Dolphin are such a popular summertime target.

 

To get in on the fun, start with the computer. Satellite forecasting services can help pinpoint likely zones based on water temperatures, underwater structure, currents and temporary features like color changes and weed lines. Reports from the local tackle shop, marina or fishing forum will help narrow the search too.

 

On the water, the boat’s electronics will be invaluable tools. The chart plotter will identify ledges, humps and depth contours that concentrate bait. Some units offer real-time data overlays. Dial in the radar to paint frigates and other birds hunting for bait and keep a pair of binoculars handy to confirm the blips. The sounder will show the differences in water temperatures. Dolphin love hot water, so even a degree or two of change could mean a concentration of fish.

Having a mixed tackle set-up will expand your dolphin opportunities. Big plastic chugger and jet head lures on trolling combos run several waves behind the boat will cover plenty of water. A heavy Nylure lead jig in bright yellow trolled way back is a surefire bet. It often produces when nothing else will. A heavy spinning outfit with a large surface lure like a Sebile Popper can be cast quickly whenever the birds are working bait, or you run across a nice weed line or floating debris. Dolphin love to hang around anything, from wooden pallets, oil drums, trees and other flotsam. These “surface structures” attract small baitfish, which in turn attracts hungry dolphin. Another spinning outfit with a stout live bait hook and a chunk of ballyhoo is great enticement when that gang of gaffers does show up.

Dolphin typically travels in packs so once one is hooked, keep it in the water as long as possible. The thrashing and commotion will pull its school mates into casting range. If, after catching a couple the fish seem to lose interest, throw a handful of small cut ballyhoo pieces overboard. That will usually fire ‘em up again. Another trick is to use the raw water washdown hose and spray a light shower near the boat. The noise and dimpling water often triggers another feeding frenzy.

After a fun fight comes the best part—eating the catch. Dolphin filets are very mild and can be cooked a variety of ways. It’s hard to beat a big slab hot off the grill, however.

Visit Yamaha Outboards.com Today.

 

Original Source: Sportsmans Lifestyle.com

 

Yamaha Outboards Mobile App is Essential for Anglers on the Road

 

Yamaha Outboards Mobile App is Essential for Anglers on the Road

ACCESS TO YOUR OUTBOARD’S INFORMATION AND NEAREST YAMAHA DEALER LOCATION ARE JUST TWO OF THE FEATURES YOU’LL USE ON A REGULAR BASIS.

By Dean Rojas

Yamaha Pro Staff

On my way to the last Bassmaster Elite Series event on Toledo Bend, I realized that I didn’t pack my back-up prop. I like to carry two props at all times, just in case I hit something and ding the prop on my boat, I can easily change it out right on the water. It can be the difference between just getting home or making the weigh-in in time, so it’s a standard practice for me.

When you’re on the road, you can’t just swing back by the house and get whatever you need, which is one of the reasons I have the free Yamaha Outboards Mobile App on my cell phone. One of the features of the App is that you can quickly access the location and hours of the nearest Yamaha dealer, which is what I did. I ran over to the dealer and picked up one of the props from their inventory and replaced it later. As a boat owner, the Dealer Locater feature is really nice, particularly when you’re on the road or travel to other towns to fish. It gives you a map from your location to the dealership, along with all their contact information and the products and services they provide. It can save you time and effort by keeping you from going somewhere that isn’t open or doesn’t handle your motor issue. 

The Dealer Locator is a really practical feature for all boat owners that are on the road, and if you drive to fish certain lakes on a regular basis, you can save the information, so you have quick access to the dealers if you need it. Before the season ever starts, I go through the Dealer Locater and save the contact information for all Yamaha Dealers in scheduled tournament areas. I’ll also use it to find a dealer anywhere else on the road.

The Yamaha Outboards Mobile App is free and works on Apple® or Android devices. You can visit iTunes® or Google Play to download.

When you open the App, it takes you to four options: My YamahaDealers, Performance and Stays Hooked. Each of these buttons has a unique feature for Yamaha owners. You can go into the My Yamaha option and register your outboard motor using your PID Number. From there, it will access the information on the motor and give you the start and end dates of your current warranty along with a countdown clock on how much longer you have to get an extended warranty before that option runs out. If it’s a new motor, you can log and track the break-in period along with scheduled maintenance.

Because the App stores information such as the Hull ID# and Yamaha Outboard PID, I’ll use it when I’m filling out information for my boat insurance or registration. It’s just a quick access system to everything about your boat.

As I said before, the Dealers option will help you find the nearest dealer if you’re ever in a jam and need parts or service, or provide you with contact information if you’re just looking to call and order something.

The Performance option allows you to access all the Yamaha Performance Bulletins, which are records of boat and motor combinations that Yamaha Application Engineers test and evaluate, like speed and fuel burn at different RPMs, along with other pertinent data, such as the prop they were using. It’s great to be able to quickly access the criteria the Yamaha Technicians utilized to help get maximum performance from the boat and motor combination they tested.

I know a lot of guys who look at Performance Bulletins regularly just to know what prop they should buy. You can bookmark any of the Bulletins for future reference or share them with friends who may want to utilize that information as well.

The last button on the Yamaha Outboards Mobile App is the Stay Hooked option, which basically provides quick access to all the Yamaha Social Media sites, which I check on a regular basis, because people are always sharing information about their boats and motors. I’ve gotten some really great tips from Yamaha Outboard owners on those sites.

There’s also a list of Frequently Asked Questions and the Answers to those questions so that you can keep track of any news related to your Yamaha Outboard. This feature is really cool because if there’s an issue with an outboard model or new way to troubleshoot a problem, you’ll hear about it first in this section.

It’s kind of funny, but when I first downloaded the Yamaha Outboards Mobile App I figured I’d never use it, but it’s something I refer to on a regular basis and use to track my maintenance on my motor. When I sold my last boat and motor (I get a new one every year), I could show anyone who was interested all the information about the break-in and maintenance, so I had a great source of information about my personal outboard motor. When I’m at a tournament and filling out the paperwork, I’ll refer to the App for my boat and motor numbers.

The Yamaha Outboards Mobile App is super simple and easy to use, and if you get in the habit of playing with it on a regular basis, you’ll find inputting the information really takes only a few minutes of your time. But when you need information, the answers are right there in your pocket. Check it out. It’s free and really does have some great features. 

Visit Yamaha Outboards and get your Mobile App Today!

 

Apple, iPad, and iTunes are registered trademarks of Apple, Inc. Google Play and Android are trademarks of Google, Inc.

 

Original Source: Yamaha Outboards.com 

 

Yamaha Offers More Than Just Outboard Motors

 

Yamaha Offers More Than Just Outboard Motors

FROM FUEL EFFICIENCY AND RELIABILITY IN THEIR MOTORS TO NEW MOTOR PROMOTIONS AND HELM MASTER™, THERE’S A LOT OF GOOD THINGS GOING ON

By George Mitchell

Yamaha Pro Staff

 

Last week I was fishing out of the Miami Beach Marina on a 32 Yellowfin with twin 300 h.p. Yamaha 4.2 Liter V6 four stroke outboards. I spent a good portion of my life fishing South Florida before I moved up the east coast to Jupiter, so going back top Miami was like homecoming weekend for me.

We decided to go reef hopping and fished some of my spots off Box Shoal and Triumph Reef, and it was like old times. We deployed our chum bags, threw the cast net and caught a bunch of live ballyhoo and then put two baits on the surface and two on the bottom. The surface baits caught a bunch of Spanish mackerel and even a big cero mackerel, but it was the mutton snapper we caught on the deep baits that really made it a successful trip.

 

That big Yellowfin with twin 300 h.p. Yamaha 4.2 Liter V6 four strokes had just phenomenal fuel economy. We averaged 2.2 to 2.4 miles per gallon each day, which is as good as it gets on a boat that size with twin outboards.

We didn’t catch any huge muttons, but we caught a good number of nice ones. We caught three or four mutton snapper each day, which is a pretty productive day on the water.

At the end of the week, I took my son Eddie and some of his friends out of Jupiter Inlet to fish an area to the north off Hobe Sound called Pecks Lake, where the Spanish mackerel just stack up in the winter months. That was nothing less than a blast. We spent two days fishing those Spanish mackerel, which isn’t real tough fishing, but it was fun fishing where you catch a lot of fish.

The next big event I have coming up is the Miami International Boat Show® in Miami Beach, Florida February 13-17. I’ll have my 36 Yellowfin with triple 300 h.p. Yamaha 4.2 Liter V6 four strokes and the Yamaha Helm Master Integrated Digital Control System in the water at the Sea Isle Marina. I’ll be running test rides and showcasing the Yamaha Helm Master Integrated Digital Control System for those that sign up as part of the Yamaha Demo Tour.

Besides being able to see firsthand the performance of the 300 h.p. Yamaha 4.2 Liter V6 four stroke, you can also see the Yamaha Helm Master Integrated Digital Control System put through all the paces. If you take a test ride, you also qualify for some extended warranty packages, so if you’re looking to purchase a boat or Yamaha outboard while at the Miami Boat Show, you definitely want to take advantage of this opportunity. Visit the Yamaha booth (R100) at the Miami Beach Convention Center or stop by the tent at the Sea Isle Marina to schedule a demo ride.

Until the Miami International Boat Show, I’ll be doing a lot of sail fishing out of Jupiter, Florida. The fish are just arriving, and I’ve been using my Yamaha Helm Master Integrated Digital Control to help me deploy the baits and move them into position in front of fish. The Yamaha Helm Master Integrated Digital Control System is compatible with the majority of autopilots on the market, so when I arrive at my fishing spot I’ll put one motor in gear and use the autopilot to maintain my heading, and then use an Autotether wireless kill switch so I can walk to the stern and hook up a bait and deploy it.

 

I always put a balloon on my first bait, and it will be my long flat line bait, and I use it to get a feel for my drift and how the wind and currents are affecting my bait spread. Then I’ll put another bait out tethered through the shoulders, so it will swim down. I’ll freeline that bait.

Once the flatline baits are out, I’ll start putting baits out on the kites. When all the baits are out, then I’ll move back to the helm and disengage the autopilot and use the Yamaha Helm Master Integrated Digital Control System to maneuver the baits left or right, so they’re positioned over any wrecks or structure we want to fish around.

It’s really nice having the autopilot integrating with the Yamaha Helm Master and everything working together so that it only takes on person to operate the boat, deploy the baits and position them to produce the most efficient and effective opportunity to catch a sailfish. From there, it’s up to the fish to find and catch the bait.

Visit Yamaha Outboards Today!

 

Original Source:  Yamaha Outboards.com 

 

Finding Bass During a Mixed Spawn Season

 

Finding Bass During a Mixed Spawn Season

Yamaha Pro Mark Davis Offers Two Solutions For Catching Bass This Spring

Warmer-than-normal winter temperatures have shuffled bass spawning schedules on many lakes throughout the country this spring, but Mark Davis has seen it before, and the veteran Yamaha Pro knows just how to approach the problem.

“With the milder winter, bass began spawning much earlier than usual this year so when a fisherman heads to a lake this month, he’s probably going to find some bass in post-spawn, others on spawning beds, and even a few still in the pre-spawn stage,” notes Davis, a three-time B.A.S.S.® Angler of the Year and winner of the 1993 Bassmaster Classic.® “The fish are doing a lot of different things, but not a lot of them are doing the same thing.

“It’s a real curve ball, because some bass may be in water only a foot deep while others can be in water 20 feet deep, and the rest of them are somewhere in between.”

The first solution Davis offers for catching some of these fish is for an angler to simply begin fishing the way he wants to fish, using the lures and techniques in which he has the most confidence. 

He should decide which type of spawning fish he wants to catch, choose an area of the lake where that is likely to be happening, and then concentrate entirely on those fish. For example, if he prefers to go after post-spawn bass, Davis suggests looking for slightly deeper water in the 15 to 20-foot range and fishing a deep diving crankbait, a football head jig, or a Carolina rig and staying in that area of a lake.

“If you decide on this approach, you really need to forget about any shallow water bass,” emphasizes the Yamaha Pro, “because if you don’t commit totally to what you’re doing, you’ll never fish as effectively as you need to. Just remember, you’re probably not going to find a lot of bass because they’re so scattered.”

Davis describes his second, completely opposite solution as “junk fishing,” in which a fisherman does work both shallow and deep water. If he sees a potential shallow water target, he can cast to it, then turn and make his next cast toward standing timber in deeper water. He might follow with a third cast ahead of the boat to still another spot. Junk fishing usually involves a lot of running to different places, and it frequently means fishing entirely new water each day. This spring, it’s been a technique used by many of the tournament pros in both Bassmaster® and FLW® events.

“This is how I fished the recent Bassmaster® Elite tournament at Toledo Bend,” Davis admits. “I started the tournament in deep water looking for post-spawn bass, and I caught 24 keepers the first day, but all of them were small fish, and I only weighed in about 12 pounds. You can’t even place in a Toledo Bend event with weights like that, so I changed completely. The rest of the tournament I junk-fished water down to about 10 feet, working shallow for spawning and pre-spawn bass, and I eventually finished 36th overall.

“It wasn’t the way I wanted to fish, but on Toledo Bend, there is a huge bass population, so I actually moved up in the standings each day. On lakes that don’t have a large population of fish, a spring like the one we’re having now can really make fishing difficult.”

Another part of the problem, adds Davis, is the increased fishing pressure bass are receiving now, which also makes them more difficult to catch. Because fish are seeing more lures than ever before, and many are being caught and released multiple times, anglers need to remember to keep trying different lures and retrieves until some combination starts bringing strikes. 

Visit Yamaha Outboards.com Today!

Original Source; Yamaha Outboards.com 

Get the Right Gaff!

 

Get the Right Gaff!

By Capt. Gus Cane

Nets work well for handling smaller inshore species, but for big, powerful adversaries gaffs are the preferred tool for landing fish. There are several sizes, lengths and even styles of gaffs though, so getting the right one is important.

Gaffs handles are usually made of aluminum or fiberglass. The hook end of the shaft is often tapered for less resistance in the water. The butt end is thicker for extra strength and has a plastic or EVA foam grip for better retention with wet hands. The hook itself is stainless steel of various gauges depending on the size and type. A rounded bend hook is the most popular, although diamond-shaped hooks are becoming more common. When considering shaft lengths, take into account the height of the boat’s gunwales above the waterline. Shorter lengths offer better control, while longer ones reduce the reach. Storage aboard the boat when the gaff is not in use is another consideration before purchasing.

For smaller sized fish like schoolie kingfish or dolphin, a 2-inch hook on a 4- to 6-foot shaft gaff is a good choice. The hook’s gape or the distance between the hook point and shaft or handle should match the approximate depth of the fish’s body being landed. The smaller the gauge of hook, the easier it will penetrate. A 3-inch gaff will handle fish up to 50 pounds or so, while a 4-inch gaff is designed for big broad fish like tuna and sharks up to 250 pounds. Keep in mind more than one gaff may be needed to swing fish of that size aboard.

Specialty Gaffs are designed for specific purposes. Tournament king mackerel anglers prefer 12-foot long 3-inch gaffs to make sure “smokers” don’t get away. Flying gaffs are heavy-duty versions with large gape hooks that detach from the handle. A rope is tied to a reinforced cleat on the boat, and once the fish is gaffed, the hook pulls free, yet the rope keeps the trophy tethered. Flying gaffs are mostly used for marlin, tuna and large pelagic sharks like makos or threshers.

Gaffing requires timing, steady nerves and lots of practice. Veteran gaff men make sure the hook point is facing down and towards the boat as the fish is brought alongside to avoid breaking the line. It’s best to aim the hook point towards the head for better control and not ruin the meat. After the fish is gaffed, the angler should back off the reel drag or switch to the clicker mechanism to prevent line overruns if the fish takes off again. Communication between the angler and the gaff man is critical too. The angler shouldn’t pull the fish’s head out of the water, while the gaffer must wait patiently for a clean shot. With the proper timing and deft moves, even the largest prey can be gaffed, subdued and brought safely aboard.

Visit Yamaha Outboards.com today.

Original Source:  Sportsmans Lifestyle.com 

Yamaha Marine Endorses Ocean Debris Cleanup Bill

 

Yamaha Marine Endorses Ocean Debris Cleanup Bill
SAVE OUR SEAS ACT IS GOOD FOR BOATERS, ANGLERS, AND COASTAL COMMUNITIES

Yamaha Marine Group today announced its endorsement of S. 756, the bipartisan Save Our Seas Act, which was introduced in the U.S. Senate by Senators Dan Sullivan (R-AK), Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI), and Cory Booker (D-NJ.)  The bill aims to strengthen research and international coordination of anti-debris efforts to protect America’s oceans, coastlines, and inland waterways.  In addition to reauthorizing the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA®) Marine Debris Program, the bill allows for additional funding to assist with debris cleanup, and encourages the executive branch to engage with the nations responsible for the majority of marine debris.

sea polluted with plastic garbage

“When Senator Sullivan told us about the Save Our Seas Act in mid-March, we were eager to support it,” said Martin Peters, Senior Manager, Government Relations, Yamaha Marine Group. “Keeping America’s oceans and waterways clean is very important to boaters and anglers, and we encourage the entire industry to send letters in support of this bill to their Congressmen through Yamaha Marine Advocacy or BassforSalt.com.”

Boaters and anglers are encouraged to send prewritten letters of support to their legislators through Bass Anglers for Saltwater Conservation, which can be found at BassforSalt.com.

The Save Our Seas Act was unanimously passed out of the Senate Commerce Committee on April 5, 2017, and now awaits action on the Senate floor. It has also been endorsed by Senators Chris Coons (D-DE), Jim Inhofe (R-OK), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Gary Peters (D-MI), and Thom Tillis (R-NC.)

“The Charm of Fishing is that it is the pursuit of what is elusive but attainable, a perpetual series of occasions for hope” John Buchan

Yamaha Marine products are marketed throughout the United States and around the world. Yamaha Marine Group, based in Kennesaw, Ga., supports its 2,000 U.S. dealers and boat builders with marketing, training and parts for Yamaha’s full line of products and strives to be the industry leader in reliability, technology and customer service. Yamaha Marine is the only outboard brand to have earned NMMA®’s C.S.I. Customer Satisfaction Index award every year since its inception. Visit www.yamahaoutboards.com.

This document contains many of Yamaha’s valuable trademarks. It may also contain trademarks belonging to other companies. Any references to other companies or their products are for identification purposes only and are not intended to be an endorsement. * Helm Master available on select new twin, triple and quad Yamaha outboards installed on new boat packages manufactured by participating boat builders and sold by authorized dealers only.

Original Source:  Yamaha Outboards.com 

Yamaha F90 Outboard Named One of Boating Industry®’s 2017 Top Products

 

Yamaha F90 Outboard Named One of Boating Industry®’s 2017 Top Products

THIRD CONSECUTIVE YEAR FOR RECOGNITION FOR YAMAHA OUTBOARDS

Yamaha Marine Group announced today that its new F90 outboard has been named one of Boating Industry’s® 2017 Top Products. The publication’s fourth annual Top Products list was published in the May edition of Boating Industry®magazine. This is the third consecutive year that Yamaha Outboards has made the list.

“This year, we’ve selected 50 of the best new or updated products and services for the marine industry, ranging from accessories to boats to engines and more,” said Boating Industry® editor in chief Jonathan Sweet. “To be eligible, products had to have been introduced or significantly updated since January 2016. From hundreds of nominations, the top products stood out for impact on the industry, innovation and how they advance their product category – or create a new segment.”

“We are honored that the F90 has been recognized amongst Boating Industry’s®Top Products for 2017,” said Dale Barnes, Division Manager, Marketing, Yamaha Marine Group. “The all-new F90 leads its class in torque and acceleration, and the improvements made to this outboard make it a great choice for a variety of boats.”

The new F90 employs a single overhead camshaft to drive four valves per cylinder, which saves weight while increasing volumetric efficiency – and makes more power. Weighing in at 353 pounds, the F90 is thirteen pounds lighter than its predecessor and displaces 1.8 liters versus 1.6 liters.

The F90 is not just quicker, it’s also quieter, which means a better boating and fishing experience for consumers. The outboard can be paired with several Yamaha propellers with the exclusive Shift Dampener System™ (SDS™), including Talon® (GP and Pontoon), for even greater quiet and comfort.

The F90 is compatible with Yamaha’s Variable Trolling RPM Switch

(VTS®) for slow trolling and better fishing. It can be rigged for use with Yamaha’s award-winning multifunction tiller handle, and features improved charging, with 35 amps of power over the previous 25 amps. The F90 is also compatible with Yamaha’s Command Link® 6Y8 and 6YC digital gauges, as well as Yamaha’s Y-COP®, for increased theft protection and security.

Yamaha Marine products are marketed throughout the United States and around the world. Yamaha Marine Group, based in Kennesaw, Ga., supports its 2,000 U.S. dealers and boat builders with marketing, training and parts for Yamaha’s full line of products and strives to be the industry leader in reliability, technology and customer service. Yamaha Marine is the only outboard brand to have earned NMMA®’s C.S.I. Customer Satisfaction Index award every year since its inception. Visit www.yamahaoutboards.com.

This document contains many of Yamaha’s valuable trademarks. It may also contain trademarks belonging to other companies. Any references to other companies or their products are for identification purposes only and are not intended to be an endorsement.

Original Source: Yamaha Outboards.com